NYU LGBTQ Student Center
After the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, African American women tried to cast their votes. Unfortunately, they were met with hostility, not only at the polls but at the National Women’s Suffrage Party (NWP) Convention. At the 1921 NWP Convention, a delegation of 60 African American women representing 14 states requested an interview with Alice Paul, leader of the NWP, to take up the question of Black women’s disenfranchisement. The Black women were allowed to present their appeal to Paul but not to the convention delegates. Journalist Freda Kirchwey (1921) reported in The Nation that the African American women sought to have the NWP appoint a special committee to investigate violations in the 1920 election. Kirchwey went on to state, “Miss Paul was indifferent to this appeal and resented the presence of the delegation.” Paul and other White leaders “repeatedly explained to inquiring delegates that in Georgia, Florida and Mississippi Colored Women are not politically worse off than Colored men.”

Ula Tyler in “The Historical Evolution of Black Feminist Theory and Practice”

This is why I will always say that the 19th amendment allowed for WHITE women to vote. Not women in general. And this was the intention of white feminists when working towards the passage of the 19th amendment. To enfranchise white women and white women alone. Black women and men could not truly vote in practice throughout the United States until the Civil Rights Act in 1964. 

(via daniellemertina)

oppression is not a feeling. reducing it how to a community ‘feels’ they are being treated minimizes the violences that are enacted upon them, makes structural injustices a matter of perception of individual acceptance or rejection of oppressive conditions. oppression creates feelings, definitely. it creates trauma, internalized conflict, dissonance, confusion. but oppression is not a feeling.
Ngọc Loan Trần, quoted in this fabulous Black Girl Dangerous article. 

(via slowdisaster)

riskpig:

clara-the-slytherin-graduate:

I find it really interesting that the historical men like Vincent Van Gogh, Winston Churchill and Richard Nixon portrayed in Moffat Who are always three dimensional and treated respectfully, while the historical women like Elizabeth the First and Nefertiti, are always love sick idiots drooling over the Doctor.

It almost seems like Moffat cannot take women seriously, even if they ruled nations.

stormbramble:

Can we please stop making fun of people who are over 20 and are still virgins

Can we please stop making fun of people who are not interested in sex/are repulsed by sex

Can we please stop making fun of people who aren’t interested in a sexual or romantic relationship

'Just because I got an Emmy nomination doesn't mean the lives of trans people aren't in peril every day.'
Laverne Cox (via angerisbeautiful-79)

mskamalakhan:

sallysbutter:

birth control pills: 

  • can treat cysts, endometriosis, pcos, and other potentially life-threatening conditions
  • can lessen severe symptoms of menstruation
  • can treat hormonal imbalances that result in severe acne and other side effects
  • can prevent pregnancy from ever occurring

erectile dysfunction drugs:

  • give you an erection

sundays-end:

peculiar-doll:

werewolf1992:

stfueverything:

Across the globe, Nestlé is pushing to privatize and control public water resources.

Nestlé’s Chairman of the Board, Peter Brabeck, has explained his philosophy with “The one opinion, which I think is extreme, is represented by the NGOs, who bang on about declaring water a public right. That means as a human being you should have a right to water. That’s an extreme solution.”

Since that quote has gotten widespread attention, Brabeck has backtracked, but his company has not. Around the world, Nestlé is bullying communities into giving up control of their water. It’s time we took a stand for public water sources.

Tell Nestlé that we have a right to water. Stop locking up our resources!

At the World Water Forum in 2000, Nestlé successfully lobbied to stop water from being declared a universal right — declaring open hunting season on our local water resources by the multinational corporations looking to control them. For Nestlé, this means billions of dollars in profits. For us, it means paying up to 2,000 percent more for drinking water because it comes from a plastic bottle.

Now, in countries around the world, Nestlé is promoting bottled water as a status symbol. As it pumps out fresh water at high volume, water tables lower and local wells become degraded. Safe water becomes a privilege only affordable for the wealthy.

In our story, clean water is a resource that should be available to all. It should be something we look after for the public good, to keep safe for generations, not something we pump out by billions of gallons to fuel short-term private profits. Nestlé thinks our opinion is “extreme”, but we have to make a stand for public resources. Please join us today in telling Nestlé that it’s not “extreme” to treat water like a public right.

Tell Nestlé to start treating water like a public right, not a source for private profits!

 
 
 

 
Sources and further reading:
Nestlé: The Global Search for Liquid Gold, Urban Times, June 11th, 2013
Bottled Water Costs 2000 Times As Much As Tap Water, Business Insider, July 12th, 2013
Peter Brabeck discussion his philosophy about water rights

thingstoreblogforwork:

thefrogman:

[redacted] replied to your post: Super Important Business Announcement

I’m confused. We’re to refer to a single person as ‘they/them’?

Yes.

Delling is agender. They do not fall anywhere on the gender spectrum. Using he/him and she/her is not appropriate.

Modern…

femme-gone-rogue:

Our sex ed is a joke; it’s literally nothing but a rundown of STDs and their symptoms. Or it was when I was in middle school. I doubt it’s gotten any better.

femme-gone-rogue:

Our sex ed is a joke; it’s literally nothing but a rundown of STDs and their symptoms. Or it was when I was in middle school. I doubt it’s gotten any better.

gutcolour:

if you’re cis and you don’t always like being the gender people say you are, that makes sense, because gender is necessarily a rigid and imperfect way of categorizing people. but instead of thinking you have to just deal with it and accept your assigned gender, have you considered: don’t do that. gender is a fake as hell imposition and you don’t have to obey it. follow your gay little heart to greener and freer pastures

socialjusticefeline:

Feel free to circulate this if you wish. I figure it’d be useful for some of you.

pumpkinskull:

this-is-not-jewish:

If you’ve spent any time discussing or reading about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, I guarantee you’ve heard some variation of this statement:

OMG, Jews think any criticism of Israel is anti-Semitic!

In the interests of this post, I’m going to…

shiporsink:

lilkittygrl:

you-can-call-me-carl:

How come a girl can wear guys clothes and look cute or wear a suit and look hot, but when a guy wears a dress or a skirt it’s weird?

because our society thinks it’s degrading to be feminine

image

no-bucks-for-this-doe:

why is it that people are always saying “girls can have short hair and not be lesbians” but not “lesbians can have long hair and still be lesbians”

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NYU LGBTQ Student Center
After the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment, African American women tried to cast their votes. Unfortunately, they were met with hostility, not only at the polls but at the National Women’s Suffrage Party (NWP) Convention. At the 1921 NWP Convention, a delegation of 60 African American women representing 14 states requested an interview with Alice Paul, leader of the NWP, to take up the question of Black women’s disenfranchisement. The Black women were allowed to present their appeal to Paul but not to the convention delegates. Journalist Freda Kirchwey (1921) reported in The Nation that the African American women sought to have the NWP appoint a special committee to investigate violations in the 1920 election. Kirchwey went on to state, “Miss Paul was indifferent to this appeal and resented the presence of the delegation.” Paul and other White leaders “repeatedly explained to inquiring delegates that in Georgia, Florida and Mississippi Colored Women are not politically worse off than Colored men.”

Ula Tyler in “The Historical Evolution of Black Feminist Theory and Practice”

This is why I will always say that the 19th amendment allowed for WHITE women to vote. Not women in general. And this was the intention of white feminists when working towards the passage of the 19th amendment. To enfranchise white women and white women alone. Black women and men could not truly vote in practice throughout the United States until the Civil Rights Act in 1964. 

(via daniellemertina)

oppression is not a feeling. reducing it how to a community ‘feels’ they are being treated minimizes the violences that are enacted upon them, makes structural injustices a matter of perception of individual acceptance or rejection of oppressive conditions. oppression creates feelings, definitely. it creates trauma, internalized conflict, dissonance, confusion. but oppression is not a feeling.
Ngọc Loan Trần, quoted in this fabulous Black Girl Dangerous article. 

(via slowdisaster)

riskpig:

clara-the-slytherin-graduate:

I find it really interesting that the historical men like Vincent Van Gogh, Winston Churchill and Richard Nixon portrayed in Moffat Who are always three dimensional and treated respectfully, while the historical women like Elizabeth the First and Nefertiti, are always love sick idiots drooling over the Doctor.

It almost seems like Moffat cannot take women seriously, even if they ruled nations.

stormbramble:

Can we please stop making fun of people who are over 20 and are still virgins

Can we please stop making fun of people who are not interested in sex/are repulsed by sex

Can we please stop making fun of people who aren’t interested in a sexual or romantic relationship

'Just because I got an Emmy nomination doesn't mean the lives of trans people aren't in peril every day.'
Laverne Cox (via angerisbeautiful-79)

mskamalakhan:

sallysbutter:

birth control pills: 

  • can treat cysts, endometriosis, pcos, and other potentially life-threatening conditions
  • can lessen severe symptoms of menstruation
  • can treat hormonal imbalances that result in severe acne and other side effects
  • can prevent pregnancy from ever occurring

erectile dysfunction drugs:

  • give you an erection

sundays-end:

peculiar-doll:

werewolf1992:

stfueverything:

Across the globe, Nestlé is pushing to privatize and control public water resources.

Nestlé’s Chairman of the Board, Peter Brabeck, has explained his philosophy with “The one opinion, which I think is extreme, is represented by the NGOs, who bang on about declaring water a public right. That means as a human being you should have a right to water. That’s an extreme solution.”

Since that quote has gotten widespread attention, Brabeck has backtracked, but his company has not. Around the world, Nestlé is bullying communities into giving up control of their water. It’s time we took a stand for public water sources.

Tell Nestlé that we have a right to water. Stop locking up our resources!

At the World Water Forum in 2000, Nestlé successfully lobbied to stop water from being declared a universal right — declaring open hunting season on our local water resources by the multinational corporations looking to control them. For Nestlé, this means billions of dollars in profits. For us, it means paying up to 2,000 percent more for drinking water because it comes from a plastic bottle.

Now, in countries around the world, Nestlé is promoting bottled water as a status symbol. As it pumps out fresh water at high volume, water tables lower and local wells become degraded. Safe water becomes a privilege only affordable for the wealthy.

In our story, clean water is a resource that should be available to all. It should be something we look after for the public good, to keep safe for generations, not something we pump out by billions of gallons to fuel short-term private profits. Nestlé thinks our opinion is “extreme”, but we have to make a stand for public resources. Please join us today in telling Nestlé that it’s not “extreme” to treat water like a public right.

Tell Nestlé to start treating water like a public right, not a source for private profits!

 
 
 

 
Sources and further reading:
Nestlé: The Global Search for Liquid Gold, Urban Times, June 11th, 2013
Bottled Water Costs 2000 Times As Much As Tap Water, Business Insider, July 12th, 2013
Peter Brabeck discussion his philosophy about water rights

thingstoreblogforwork:

thefrogman:

[redacted] replied to your post: Super Important Business Announcement

I’m confused. We’re to refer to a single person as ‘they/them’?

Yes.

Delling is agender. They do not fall anywhere on the gender spectrum. Using he/him and she/her is not appropriate.

Modern…

femme-gone-rogue:

Our sex ed is a joke; it’s literally nothing but a rundown of STDs and their symptoms. Or it was when I was in middle school. I doubt it’s gotten any better.

femme-gone-rogue:

Our sex ed is a joke; it’s literally nothing but a rundown of STDs and their symptoms. Or it was when I was in middle school. I doubt it’s gotten any better.

gutcolour:

if you’re cis and you don’t always like being the gender people say you are, that makes sense, because gender is necessarily a rigid and imperfect way of categorizing people. but instead of thinking you have to just deal with it and accept your assigned gender, have you considered: don’t do that. gender is a fake as hell imposition and you don’t have to obey it. follow your gay little heart to greener and freer pastures

socialjusticefeline:

Feel free to circulate this if you wish. I figure it’d be useful for some of you.

pumpkinskull:

this-is-not-jewish:

If you’ve spent any time discussing or reading about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, I guarantee you’ve heard some variation of this statement:

OMG, Jews think any criticism of Israel is anti-Semitic!

In the interests of this post, I’m going to…

shiporsink:

lilkittygrl:

you-can-call-me-carl:

How come a girl can wear guys clothes and look cute or wear a suit and look hot, but when a guy wears a dress or a skirt it’s weird?

because our society thinks it’s degrading to be feminine

image

no-bucks-for-this-doe:

why is it that people are always saying “girls can have short hair and not be lesbians” but not “lesbians can have long hair and still be lesbians”